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    We find, therefore, that several large granaries were built at the Green Hills, at first constructed of logs, and afterwards brick buildings of two and three stories. Captain Putland died in 1808, and was buried first in old St. The first Wesleyan class-meeting was held in 1812, when six members were enrolled, and the number soon increased to nineteen. Carvosso arrived in New South Wales in 1820, and was settled at Windsor the same year. The Wesleyan Church took a keen interest in missionary affairs, especially from 1820 to 1830, and some large missionary meetings were held. Here the grain was stored under Government supervision. Philip's, Sydney, the body being removed in 1856 to Sandhills (Devonshire Street Cemetery), and in 1901 again removed to La Perouse, Botany. Ship Porpoise, Chief Magistrate throughout the Territory, and Aid de Camp to His Excellency Governor Bligh. Aged 27 years." Governor Bligh appointed Andrew Thompson as his bailiff or agent, and left the entire management of his farm in his hands. A small Wesleyan school was also taught by Edward Eagar (an emancipist lawyer), who also conducted divine service, and the same year, 1812, efforts were started to raise funds to build a chapel. Leigh arrived in the colony in the Hebe on 15th August, 1815. Samuel Marsden, Church of England Senior Chaplain, and they travelled to and from New Zealand together. Marsden had a large farm, portion of which extended right into the town of Windsor, and, knowing the desire for the erection of a chapel in Windsor, he presented Mr. Carvosso in 1820, and a house was bought for him, at a cost of two hundred and seventy pounds, known as the Mission House. He was in Sydney and Parramatta about the years 1822-5, and went to Hobart Town in May, 1825. A son, William, who was born in the Mission House, Windsor, died in England, in 1842.

    This tour occupied the time from 6th November to 13th December, 1810:— "The frequent inundations of the rivers Hawkesbury and Nepean having been hitherto attended with the most calamitous effects, with regard to crops growing in their vicinity, and in consequence of most serious injury to the necessary subsistence of the colony, the Governor has deemed it expedient (in order to guard as far as human foresight can extend against the recurrence of such calamities), to erect certain townships in the most contiguous and eligible high grounds in the several districts subjected to those inundations for the purpose of rendering every possible accommodation and security to the settlers whose farms are exposed to the floods. It is probably the building still standing behind the police barracks. West's House are on a small scale, and the latter in a very dilapidated state." "Court House (with plan).—The building is so badly executed that tho' it has not been built two years, strong settlements are showing themselves in the walls and ceilings, and the interior accommodations are not at all adapted for the purpose intended, as the plan will show." "General Observations.—The author of this report, etc., etc., would advert to the expensive and insufficient plan pursued in making and repairing bridges—the one now re-building at Windsor is a proof of this assertion, for instead of throughing over a stout truss'd and framed wooden bridge of one arch (which from the bold situation of the banks might have been done at little more cost than what is now expended) the same principle is still followed as that at first introduced into the colon; by placing piles in the sides and bed of the river, which collect all the rubbish continually floating down, and in the event of a flood must unavoidably destroy every bridge so constructed." With regard to this report we may say that the Court House stands to-day strong and solid, and in constant use, and likely to last for many years to come. Matthew's Church, but it seems as strong and hard to-day as it was ninety years ago. On 10th August, 1829, the first Circuit Court was opened in Windsor by Judge Stephen. John Howe, in December, 1809, he having had on sale "Woollens, drapery, and all sorts of lines." Governor Macquarie landed in New South Wales 28th December, 1809, and took over the administration of affaire of the colony 1st January, 1810, from Lieutenant Governor Foveaux, and on 12th January, 1810, less than a fortnight after his arrival, Governor Macquarie made Andrew Thompson a Justice of the Peace, and appointed him as Chief Magistrate for the district of the Hawkesbury. Some good cedar trees were growing in the district, and settlers were prohibited from cutting them, as the Government claimed them all. Thomas Arndell and Charles Grimes, Deputy Surveyor, were appointed resident magistrates in 1802. Grimes left the district in 1803, and was succeeded by Surveyor G. Trustees: William Cox, John Bowman, Andrew Thompson, Edward Tutterill, William Minchin. Trustees: Andrew Thompson, Thomas Biggars, Thomas Tyler. As will be seen on reference to the articles on "Schools and Churches" elsewhere, divine service was held at the Hawkesbury by Rev. A covered waggon began to ply three times a week between Windsor and Sydney, starting on 9th February, 1805. An address was presented by them to the Senior Chaplain, Rev. Marsden, on the occasion of his visiting England in 1807. A big flood in Maitland in 1875 called forth the sympathy of the Windsor residents, who subscribed one hundred and ten pounds for the relief fund. It is said that he also had an illicit distillery here. Biggars got a similar reward at the same time, spirits in those days, as was well-known, being a medium of exchange. Another address, signed by eight hundred and thirty-three residents, was presented to Governor Bligh, expressive of their confidence in his administration in the year 1808. The old denominational school system came to an end by the erection and opening: of the present Public School in 1870. However, it is known that Governor King gave him forty gallons of spirits as a reward for some service rendered on May 27th, 1806. It is evident that Andrew Thompson did traffic pretty largely in spirits, for he was fined £100 in 1807 for so doing. Again, we find in 1800 a reference to the profits made on the sale of spirits by Andrew Thompson, the Governor's bailiff. vii., page 225.) He acquired a number of properties by purchase, including property in Baker Street and in Bridge Street, Windsor. By this means valuable revisions and additions have been made. "I have read the articles on the 'Early Days of Windsor', by the Rev. "As a native of Windsor, with a clear recollection of the past seventy-five years, I may say that the author has spared no pains to make his statements accurate and reliable. The earliest Hawkesbury Crown grants included those to Samuel Wilcox, John Brindley, William Bond, John Ruffler, Alexander Wilson, and Whaelen. Thomas Westmore and William Anderson, James Ruse, Ann Blady and Joseph Smallwood, in 1797. These may be easily located on the map of the Parish of St. The grants for the same period made near Pitt Town were:—Messrs. A Government order, dated 8th April, 1804, ordered that all boats trading on the Hawkesbury River should be numbered and registered by Andrew Thompson, head constable, otherwise they would be confiscated. Errors there may be, but every effort has been made to verify the data. "His work will supply a felt want, in the literature of Windsor, and it should prove very acceptable to all lovers of the Hawkesbury districts. Stogdell, Palmer, Hobbs, Diggers, Jones, Benn, Smallwood, Dr. The present township of Pitt Town stands on portions of these grants, which had to be resumed for township purposes in 1810. A Government store was established in 1798, and placed in charge of William Baker, whose name is perpetuated in Baker Street, Windsor and Baker's Lagoon, near Richmond. In the year 1804 Governor King appointed trustees for the several Commons of the Colony. Everingham (a Matthew James Everingham died on 25th December, 1817, aged forty-eight years, and was buried in St.

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